Sichuan Vegetables in Hot Chili Oil with Garlic, Ginger, Scallions, & Peanuts (vegan & plant-based )

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

I am obsessed with the flavors of a dish called Tofu Braised in Hot Chili Oil at a local restaurant called Judy’s Sichuan. But, I could do without the deep frying of the tofu and the additional oil, as mesmerizing as it is. I have attempted a stir-fried veggie version or two in the past that were unspectacular fails.

But, recently, fellow foodie and friend, Juan Gelpi, introduced me to Sichuan peppercorns. Eureka! The missing flavor. So I started brainstorming and alighted on a non-traditional roasted prep which I love because it is hands-free cleaner, and neater.

I hope you love my tofu-less and non-braised version of Tofu Braised in Hot Chili Oil.

Sichuan Vegetables in Hot Chili Oil with Garlic, Ginger, Scallions, & Peanuts (vegan & plant-based )

Yield: 6 to 8

2 tablespoons vegetable or peanut oil
2 teaspoons sesame oil
6 to 8 cups cauliflower, broccoli, or a combination of florets
1 red bell pepper or 1/2 red and 1/2 green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 teaspoons ground Sichuan peppercorns (I purchase at Asian grocery)
2 tablespoons Chinese hot chili oil or fried chili crisp (I purchase at Kroger on International aisle)
2 to 3 inches fresh garlic, peeled and thinly sliced on diagonal
4 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced on diagonal
2 scallions, thinly sliced on diagonal
1/2 cup lightly roasted and salted peanuts

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Pour oils into large roasting pan. Add vegetables, toss in oil, sprinkle with salt and Sichuan peppercorns. Roast for 20 minutes, stirring after 10. Remove pan from oven. Increase heat to 450 degrees. Stir remaining ingredients into vegetables, scraping up caramelized bits. Return to oven for 10 minutes, stirring after 5. Crack oven door, turn off heat, and allow to cool to warm. Serve immediately.

#vegan #veganrecipes #veganfoodshare #veganfoodporn #plantbased #plantbasedrecipes #plantbasedfoodshare #plantbasedfoodporn #plantbasedSichuan #veganSichuan

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Sichuan Chex Mix with Hot Chili Oil (vegan & plant-based)

Yield: 4 quarts (16 cups or 1 gallon)

Every Christmas, my late mother made traditional Chex Mix. She would not be at all happy with my messing with tradition.

With apologies to my mother, this year’s vegan Sichuan Chex Mix is inspired by my Chinese obsession from Judy’s Sichuan in Virginia Beach, VA: Tofu Braised in Hot Chili Oil. Redolent of garlic, ginger, and chilies, this dish features 4 other key ingredients: fried tofu and stir fried jalapeños, red and green bell pepper, and peanuts over Jasmin rice.

I think, though I am not certain, that an elusive flavor in the dish is lent by Sichuan Peppercorn which I purchase st the Asian market and grind myself. Warm, but not hot (to me), this seasoning also adds a very temporary, characteristic, and pleasant lip numbing sensation. The Chex mix is delush with or without.

Seasoning Mix:
1/2 Cup vegan butter
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
2 tablespoons Fried Chili in Oil (sold in a jar on Kroger’s Asian aisle)
2 teaspoons grated ginger (I purchase it in a squeeze jar)
1 tablespoon Garlic Powder
1 tablespoon Onion Powder

Optional: 1 to 3 teaspoons ground Sichuan Peppercorn

Cereal Mix:
7 cups Rice Chex cereal
5 cups pretzel sticks
*3.5 ounces crispy fried onions in bag, carton, or can
*3.5 ounces crispy jalapeños in a bag
*3.5 ounces crispy red bell pepper or beets in a bag or carton
4 ounces roasted and salted edamame
1 cup roasted and salted peanuts

*I use Fresh Gourmet brand from Kroger. I wanted bell pepper, but couldn’t find them in two stores, so the beets added that red, sweet, and earthy element I wanted.

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Melt butter in large roasting pan in preheating oven. Stir in remaining Seasoning Mix ingredients followed by all Cereal Mix ingredients, coating evenly. Bake 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes. Cool completely and package in airtight containers.

#vegan #veganrecipes #veganfoodshare #veganfoodporn #plantbased #plantbasedrecipes #plantbasedfoodshare #plantbasedfoodporn #plantbasedsichuan #vegansichuan #plantbasedchexmix #veganchexmix
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Blooming Best Hot Chili Oil (vegan & plant-based)

I put this addicting condiment on everything…or nothing!

I first became hooked on it in Braised Tofu in Hot Chili Oil–with bell peppers, sliced garlic, and fried peanuts–at Judy’s Sichuan in Virginia Beach, VA.

My first attempt was an utter fail, but the next method I developed is never-fail. I stir this Hot Chili Oil into–or drizzle it over– roasted vegetables, beans and legumes, grains, salads, noodles, soups, vegan mayo and sauces, and even into popcorn. It makes everything better! And it makes a quick and easy gift.

1- 7.41 ounce jar Laoganma Spicy Chili Crisp (I purchase at Kroger)

1/4 cup olive, peanut, or vegetable oil

1/4 cup orange infused olive oil or another 1/4 cup olive, peanut or vegetable oil (the orange and chili combo will send you!)

5 cloves garlic minced, covered, and heated for about 30 seconds in microwave to soften

Optiomal: sea salt

Decant Spicy Chili Crisp into a 12 to 16-ounce jar. Stir in oils, garlic, and optional salt. Store, covered, in fridge. Feed mixture periodically with more Spicy Chili Crisp, oils, garlic, and salt, as desired.

#hotchilioil

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Sweet and Sour Pineapple, Onions, & Peppers (Vegan & Plant-Based)

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

This dish is so quick and easy and tastes like authentic Chinese takeout! Add tofu, as pictured, or mushrooms for an even heartier take.

I think my garnish is so cute: a retro flower made just from what I had on hand: a water chestnut with a cashew and hot chili oil center.

1/2 cup catsup
1/2 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons dark molasses
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 red bell pepper, cored and cut into chunks slightly larger than dice
1 green bell pepper, cored and cut into chunks slightly larger than dice
1 white or yellow onion, cut into chunks slightly larger than dice
1-20 ounce can pineapple tidbits in juice, drained and juice reserved (refrigerate half of pineapple for another use)
2 tablespoons cornstarch
Optional add-ins: 1 pound cubed extra firm tofu or sauteed mushrooms
Optional garnishes: sliced water chestnuts, lightly salted and roasted cashew halves, and hot chili oil

In a medium bowl, whisk together first 4 ingredients and set aside. In a tablespoon of oil or hot chili oil, or about 4 tablespoons water, sprinkle bell peppers and onion with salt and sauté until tender. Pour catsup mixture over, stir, and heat through. Whisk cornstarch into reserved pineapple juice and add to skillet with pineapple tidbits, cooking and stirring until mixture is thick and heated through. Stir in tofu or mushrooms if desired, and heat through. (Or you can saute mushrooms with other vegetables. ) Serve over rice, if you like, garnished as desired. I like to create retro flowers out of sliced water chestnuts with centers made out of 2 cashews each and a dab of hot chili oil.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Cuban-Asian Fusion Nachos + Hot Chili Oil Hack (vegan & plant-based)

Yield: 2 servings

These deliciously different–but not bizarre–nachos substitute plantains for corn chips and infuse the tasty black bean topping with a hint of coconut milk, orange, and spice from my new obsession: Sizchuan Hot Chili Oil. No one will judge if you drizzle more of the addicting oil over the top.

1/2 large yellow onion, thinly sliced

1-15 ounce can seasoned vegan black beans, including juice

3 ears grilled corn, kernels cut from cob

1 cup lightly packed baby spinach or kale leaves

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

Sea salt to taste

1/4 to 1/3 coconut milk (I use lite, but regular is more flavorful)

1 generous tablespoon Sizchuan Hot Chili Oil, made with blood orange-infused olive oil (see my hack below)

2 servings packaged plantain chips

Toppings: white vegan cheese like mozarella, halved tri-color cherry tomatoes, vegan sour cream, minced cilantro

In large skillet over medium heat, dry saute onion, stirring frequently, until starting to soften and color. Add all remaining ingredients, except chips and toppings, and cook, continuing to stir frequently, until onion is softened, greens are wilted, mixture is heated through, and flavors are married. Divide chips between 2 plates, spoon half of bean mixture over each, top as desired, and serve immediately.

Note: After topping with cheese, you can run nachos under broiler or pop into mic for 30 seconds before adding remaining toppings.

Hot Chili Oil Hack

1-8 ounce jar Lao Gan Ma: Spicy Chili Crisp (I purchase at Kroger or online)

4 to 5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced and softened by heating for 30 seconds in microwave

1/4 cup neutral vegetable oil

1/4 cup blood orange-infused olive oil (or another 1/4 cup oil + zest of 1/2 large orange

1/2 teaspoon sea salt or more to taste

Decant Spicy Chili Crisp into a larger jar, stir in remaining ingredients, cover, and chill. Stir before using; heat if desired. Delicious on virtually everything savory.

#vegan #veganrecipes #veganfoodshare #veganfoodporn #plantbased #plantbasedrecipes #plantbasedfoodshare #plantbasedfoodporn #vegannachos #plantbasednachos #veganasianfusion #plantbasedasianfusion #vegancubanfusion #plantbasedcubanfusion
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Crispy Baked Cauliflower (with option to bathe in Hot Chili Oil) [Vegan & Plant-Based]

Yield:. 1 to 2 servings (depending on how hungry you are and whether you serve anything alongside)

1/4 cup vegan mayo (I used Walton Farms no-calorie)

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1/4 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Approximately 25 cauliflower florets

Hot Chili Oil (see back below)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Place mayonnaise in a shallow carton or bowl. Whisk together remaining ingredients except cauliflower in a small deeper carton or bowl. Add cauliflower florets about three at a time to mayo and coat well using fingers. Drop into flour mixture, shake to coat, and place a couple inches apart on lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining florets. Bake 15 minutes, turn, and bake 15 more minutes. Serve with sauce of choice or, do as I do and dip each floret quickly into hot chili, place on serving plate, sprinkle with sliced green onion and peanuts and serve immediately with chopsticks.

Hot Chili Oil Hack: purchase a prepared product, but decant into a larger jar, and add lots more oil, 5 large cloves sliced garlic softened for 30 seconds in microwave, and salt to taste. I love a neutral oil, but, when I discovered I was out, I learned that blood orange-infused oil is absolutely lovely with the chilies.

#vegan #veganrecipes #veganfoodshare #veganfoodporn #plantbased #plantbasedrecipes #plantbasedfoodshare #plantbasedfoodporn #vegancrispybakedcauliflower #plantbasedcrispybakedcauliflower

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Chinese Black Bean Dip with Baked Wonton Chips (vegan & plant-based)

Yield: 2 servings

I love to eat like it’s happy hour even when it’s not. That is, I love appetizers. They are always the most enticing items on restaurant menus and, Even before the pandemic, I loved My own versions even more. The same goes for this brand new black bean dip with its Chinese flavors. It is sure to make any hour and every guest happy!

I recommend starting with the amounts of ingredients listed and then intensifying any of the flavors that you choose. Be careful with the ginger, as it can be overpowering and quite spicy.

1 15.5 ounce can unseasoned black beans, rinsed and drained

1 large garlic clove, minced

1 teaspoon minced ginger

1 teaspoon agave nectar

1 teaspoon soy sauce

2 teaspoons sesame oil

3 thinly sliced green onions, save a little for garnish

Garnish: 1 teaspoon Everything Bagel seasoning or white and black sesame seeds (Everything Bagel seasoning may seem out of place, but I love it because it contains sesame seeds along with dried garlic and onion)

Accompaniments:

Prepared vegan chili sauce and a few roasted and lightly salted cashews or peanuts

Baked Wonton Chips (recipe follows )

place everything except green onions, garnishes, and accompaniments in food processor and blend and tell smooth. Stir in green onions, reserving some for garnish, transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle with reserved green onions and everything bagel seasoning. Serve with chili sauce for drizzling and Baked Wonton Chips for scooping.

Baked Wonton Chips

10 -3″ vegan wonton wrapper squares (I use Nasoya brand, halved diagonally)

Non-stick vegetable oil spray

Sea salt

Preheat oven to 350°. Place triangles of dough close together on baking sheet, spray very lightly with vegetable oil, and sprinkle with just the barest hint of sea salt. Bake for approximately 5 minutes or until golden.

#veganwontonchips #plantbasedwontonchips #veganchineseblackbeandip #plantbasedChineseblackbeandip #vegan #veganrecipes #veganfoodshare #veganfoodporn #plantbased #plantbasedrecipes #plantbasedfoodshare #plantbasedfoodporn

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Easy, Fast, Intoxicating Vegan Dan Dan Noodles
with 0 Calorie Noodles(!)

Yield: 2 servings (easily multiplies)

Vegan friends, prepare to have your pasta-loving lives changed.

Recently, I fell in love with vegan Dan Dan Noodles, both at V Street in Philadelphia and at Forbidden Bistro, our favorite Chinese restaurant here in Virginia Beach.

The problem for me and the reason I had probably never ordered Dan-Dan before is not finding vegan noodles, but all of the calories in any kind of noodle. The dish at V Street was the perfect “gateway” though, as it was a dimuntive tapas portion.  So when I noticed them on  the Forbidden Bistro menu,  I talked myself into ordering them, but I made more than one meal out of their dinner entree.

As for solving the problem of noodles and all of their calories, enter the amazing No-oodles, a thin, slightly curly, tofu-free shirataki. They have O CALORIES. That’s right. None. Nada. Zip.  Feel free to use any brand of shirataki in this recipe, including the type made with tofu, which has a few calories.  But I prefer the No-oodles, as their size and shape seems more Dan Dan-like than fetuccine-like.

Locally, I found No-oodles last weekend at a small, niche natural market called Organic Depot. After you read the list of what No-oodles don’t include–dairy, gluten, carbs, calories, etc.–you will wonder what they do include. And that is simple: water, yam flour, and lime.  Somehow, they are delicious and don’t break down when simmered.  But they lack nutrition of any kind, so you obviously have to be sure to enjoy them with accompaniments that are full of vitamins, minerals, and protein.

Dan Dan is traditionally served with julienne cucumbers, scallions, and lime.  But I subbed other ingredients that I had on had for the cuke: tricolor pear tomatoes and a delicious naturally fermented curry-flavored sauerkraut from Whole Foods that included cabbage, carrots, and cauliflower.  A vegan Kimchi would be really nice too.

I researched recipes and ultimately decided to tweak one I found online from Food and Wine.  It, and the others, called for frying the peanuts for the sauce, which sounds delicious  ut messy.  So I simply chose already roasted peanuts, the same amount of oil, and skipped the frying step because oil isn’t a problem for me when the noodles have no calories.  Though I put peanuts in the sauce, as called for by tradition, I garnished tge dish with a few cashews because I love them so.

Honestly, I could eat this dish every day.  And it’s so easy, quick, and healthful that there’s no reason not to.  Hmm…

Note: if you want to make Dan Dan Noodles with Tofu, cut 14 ounces of firm or extra firm tofu into cubes and marinate in sauce for an hour or so before removing with a slotted spoon, sauteing in an oiled skillet–or baking/broiling–and spooning over the completed dish.

low

Dan Dan No-oodles

1/4 cup peanut oil (vegetable oil will work in a pinch)
1/2 cup roasted and lightly salted peanuts (or cashews)
1 small jalapeño, stem, ribs, and seeds removed (wash hands after) or 1 teaspoon Asian fire oil (hot, spicy oil)
1 large garlic clove, halved
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons water
1 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh cilantro leaves or 1 teaspoon dried (optional)
1 tablespoon Sriracha chili sauce
1 tablespoon sugar (I like coconut sugar in this dish)
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
Sea salt to taste if needed (I don’t feel the dish needs extra salt, but it depends on your peanuts)
2-8 ounce packages No-oodles or Shirataki (if the latter is made with tofu, some calories will be involved), drained
Garnish (choose any or all): Julienne cucumber, Asian-compatible sauerkraut (I use a curry variety with cabbage, carrot, and cauliflower from Whole Foods) or Kimchi, sliced scallions, lime wedges, sesame seeds, lightly roasted and salted cashews, sprigs of mint or cilantro

Simply place all ingredients except pasta and garnishes in a food processor–I used my small processor for one recipe–and process until smooth.  Scrape into skillet and warm over low or medium heat.  Add No-oodles, stir gently, and simmer until noodles are heated through.  Serve in bowls topped with the garnishes of your choice; go for contrasts in color and texture.  Enjoy with chopsticks.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Day 14: Vegan Kung Pao Broccoli and Tofu–“Cooking ‘The Blooming Platter Cookbook’ Julie and Julia Style”

Kung Pao Tofu(A sequential installment from Kim Hastings, my photographer friend and, along with her vet husband, owner of Independence Veterinary Hospital, who decided on her own to cook her way through The Blooming Platter Cookbook: A Harvest of Seasonal Vegan Recipes Julie & Julia Style for her omnivorous family as a strategy for more healthy eating.)

I have had the Kung Pao Broccoli and Tofu recipe on my list for the last two weeks and replaced it each time. I have looked at it so many times that my book opens automatically to it now. Why have I been putting it off? Maybe it was the tofu, but I conquered my fear of that a few days ago so I’m doing this recipe today.

My husband is thrilled that it is a one skillet dish. He always has some comment about the state of the kitchen when I’m done cooking these days. I do honestly try to clean as I go. In fact I hear my mom’s voice in my head telling me those exact words but it usually looks like a cyclone went through my kitchen no matter what I do.

I must admit that I prepared chicken on the side so that if my men refused the tofu they could pick it out and substitute the chicken, but I’m not going to pick it out for them. I was a little worried about what kind of reactions I would get from this meal but I have to say that even I was impressed with the way the tofu looked (and tasted!) before I placed it in the warm oven.

Everything was moving along just fine until I realized I did not have the hot dried chiles. Now that is an important ingredient in Kung Pao and somehow I missed it so I just used a healthy amount of red pepper flakes instead. No problem. Everything else came together beautifully.

My family did not see the tofu part of the preparation so when they asked what it was I just said it was a veggie. That’s not a lie right? One just took it at face value and said it was good. The other tried to analyze it and decided it was fried mashed potato chunks. I think the funniest thing was that my older son came home to eat the leftovers the next day and when he took the foil off the dish, he was so upset that all that was left was the chicken and a few peanuts. His brother had beat him to it.

Get this – no one had eaten the chicken!! (Until that was all that was left of course). I think that speaks for itself about just how amazing this dish tastes. My challenge to get them to love vegetables just as much as the other items on the plate is working! I am so proud of myself – seriously proud.

~Kim Hastings

Kim Hastings



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Print Friendly, PDF & Email