The Blooming Platter of Vegan Recipes

Recipes for 'Vegan Soup'

Thai Coconut Milk and Vegetable Soup 1Yield: 4 servings

This soup is as delicious as it is nutritious and lovely. Thicker than most Thai restaurant soups (due to the starch in the squash), it is very filling, yet still light.

It was inspired by my love of all things Thai, but also by an over-zealous trip to the farmer’s market this week considering I am leaving town on Sunday.  In a little bit of a panic about not wasting food, I created this soup brimming over with vegetables like red bell pepper, fresh chili pepper, pattypan squash, grape tomatoes and Swiss Chard.

I had purchased 2 bunches of the chard–what was I thinking–so I created a really tasty Swissh Chard and Pumpkin Seed Pesto out of the remainder, which will freeze nicely.

I used the vegetables I had on hand, but feel free to substitute other veggies, keeping flavor, texture and color contrast in mind. In addition to the onion and bell pepper, you will want about 4 cups of vegetables. Precokl firmer vegetables like squash and carrots, and simply heat softer ones like tomatoes and mushrooms.

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 large red bell pepper, stemmed and seeded, thinly sliced
1 1-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and very thinly sliced
1 large cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons minced red or green mild chili pepper
Sea salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1-15 ounce can coconut milk or lite coconut milk
2 cups water
2 regular or 1 large vegetable bouillon cube (enough for 2 cups of water)
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 pounds pattypan squash (unpeeled and unseeded weight), baked, roasted or grilled until tender, peeled, and cut into wedges [you may substitute eggplant, zucchini and/or yellow squash]; approximately 2 cups cooked chunks
1 cup (approximately) red or gold grape tomatoes, halved
1 cup finely chopped Swiss chard (I use a food processor for this task)
1/3 cup fresh cilantro leaves and tender stems, rough chopped
Zest of 1 large lime
1/4 cup basil leaves, preferably Thai basil
4 teaspoons vegan fish sauce (sold a “vegetarian” in Asian markets) or rice wine vinegar
Garnish: 1/4 cup chopped roasted and lightly salted cashews and peanuts and sprigs of basil or cilantro

In a large (4-quart) saucepan, heat olive oil over medium-high. Add onion, bell pepper, ginger, garlic, chili pepper, and a pinch of sea salt, and freshly ground black pepper, and sauté, stirring frequently, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add coconut milk, water, bouillon cube, and soy sauce, and heat until barely simmering. Add squash, tomatoes, and Swiss chard, and return to a gently simmer. Avoid boiling. Stir in cilantro, lime zest, and basil leaves and heat through. Serve in large bowls with 1 teaspoon of vegan fish sauce or rice wine vinegar stirred into each. Garnish with chopped nuts and a sprig of basil or cilantro.

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Pureed Potato-Kale SoupYield: 8 cups

This has been an especially cold winter, which I actually like.  As such it has been the impetus for quite a few greens-based soups.  This one,served steaming hot, is perfect for a cold winter day.  But the reverse is also true: served cold in a hot day, it is the ultimate tasty and healthy vichyssoise. Besides all of the flavor-packed nutrients, each baking potato has 3.9 grams fat for a total of 7.8 grams total in this entire pot of soup!

2 baking potatoes, cubed

2 cups vegetable stock (or 2 cups water + 2 bouillon cubes)

1 medium yellow onion, diced

2 large cloves garlic, halved

2 lightly packed cups coarsely chopped kale

1/4 cup nutritional yeast

1/2 cup So Delicious coconut milk creamer

Sea salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Optional garnishes: vegan sour cream and paprika or smoked paprika

Place potatoes and 2 cups vegetable stock in a 4-quart saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium-high, reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.  Add onion and garlic, and simmer for 5 more minutes.  Add kale, and simmer for a final 5 minutes.  With a slotted spoon, remove solids to a food processor and process until smooth.  Whisk puree back into broth in saucepan along with nutritional yeast, creamer, salt and pepper to taste.  Reheat if necessary and serve hot, garnished if desired with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkle of paprika or smoked paprika

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Vegan Seafood GumboIn March, the good folks at VegNews published my Vegan Seafood Gumbo in “Recipe Club,” their e-newsletter, which I shared here on The Blooming Platter (just follow the link).

Not too long after that, the kind folks at Navitas Naturals sent me a sample of their delicious and nutritious organic Nori Powder (roasted seaweed powder) with which to experiment.  I didn’t get to it right away, but recently, with friends coming for dinner to whom I had promised gumbo, I decided to use the Nori Powder instead of Nori sheets in the gumbo stock, as I was out of the latter.

Product Image

Brilliant!  After a little research, mostly based on protein content, I determined that 1 teaspoon of Nori powder is the equivalent of 1 Nori sheet, and that worked out perfectly.  Both lend to the stock that deeply seductive briny flavor of the sea.

Plus, there is an ocean (couldn’t resist–sorry!) of uses for Nori powder.  It can be dissolved in just about anything to enhance  flavor and nutrition (protein, vitamins, minerals, and fiber), e.g.  soups, stews, purees, sauces, doughs, fillings, etc.  And it is certified organic, kosher, non-GMO, gluten-free and raw.

Enjoy this great new product and my Seafood Gumbo recipe which they have generously published on their site!

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VegnNews Recipe Club--Vegan Seafood Gumbo--ScreenshotYield: 6 to 8 servings

Earlier this week, I was thrilled to learn that VegNews–THE culinary and lifestyle magazine for we meat-free folks–featured my brand new Vegan Seafood Gumbo recipe  in their culinary e-newsletter, “Recipe Club.”  Thanks to all the great folks at VegNews!

They were happy to grant me permission to post my recipe.  But, because they were so generous–and because everything they produce is of such high quality–I urge you to visit their website and scroll down on the right to  “Let’s Talk” where you can quickly sign up for the “Recipe Club” culinary e-newsletter with the click of a button.

Now, about that recipe…

Having once had a vegan gumbo prepared by one of the finest (albeit non-vegan) chefs on the Eastern Seaboard–and not caring for it–I thought a delicious briny-tasting seafood-flavored vegan gumbo simply couldn’t be achieved.

But fast-forward a few years and lots of cooking experience, and the stars aligned to bring authentic gumbo within my reach.  And I’m thrilled to share it with you

This is a true gumbo, folks; not a soup or a stew.  That means that the roux is all-important.  Besides fearing that I could never hit the right flavor profile, I shied away from gumbo for years, as I loathed the idea of standing over the stove, stirring a pot for nearly an hour.  But when I recently learned about an oven-baked method for making roux on Cook’s Country TV, that all changed.

Boy, did it!

Though gumbo is a fairly new addition to my repertoire, I am trying to make up for lost time.  My first recipe, one for a delicious (if I do say so) Vegan Chicken and Sausage Gumbo, was recently published here on One Green Planet.  However, since my Mississippi and Texas relatives have little more than disdain for any dish containing chicken and sausage that dares call itself gumbo, I knew I would have to eventually create a recipe for a vegan seafood gumbo.  And the opportunity presented itself sooner rather than later.  Actually,  a Sunday morning plus a powerful craving was all the urging I needed.

Laissez les bontemps rouler!

 

Blooming Platter Vegan Seafood Gumbo

Ingredients:

  • 5 3/4 cups water
  • 6 sheets Nori (roasted seaweed; the type used for making sushi)
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon Old Bay Seasoning
  • 1/1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 2 cups textured vegetable protein (TVP)
  • 3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour (I use white whole wheat)
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small-medium finely diced yellow onion
  • 1 red or orange bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 1 celery rib, chopped fine
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme (or 1/4 teaspoon dry)
  • 1 teaspoon file (dried sassafras leaves)
  • 1-14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained
  • 1/4 cup vegan fish sauce
  • 2 cups frozen cut okra, thawed
  • Accompaniment: 3 to 4 cups of cooked white rice

Preparation:

  1. MAKE STOCK  In a 4-quart saucepan, combine water, Nori, 1 tablespoon salt, Old Bay Seasoning, soy sauce, and lemon halves.  Cover loosely, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.  Turn off heat, cover tightly, and let sit while continuing with recipe.  Strain before using, pressing on solids with the back of a wooden spoon.
  2. MAKE ROUX Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large cast iron skillet or heavy Dutch oven (my preference) over medium heat, toast ¾ cup flour, stirring constantly, until just beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in oil until smooth. Cover (use foil if you have no lid that fits your pan), transfer skillet or pot to oven, and cook until mixture is deep brown and fragrant, about 20 minutes, checking and stirring after 10. It will look almost chocolatey or the color of an old copper penny.  (If not making gumbo right away, store roux in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. To use, heat the roux in a  cast iron skillet or heavy Dutch oven over medium-high heat, whisking constantly, until just smoking, and continue with step 2.)
  3. COOK AROMATICS Transfer skillet or Dutch oven to stovetop and whisk cooked roux to combine. Add onion, bell pepper, celery, and a pinch of salt and pepper, and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until softened, about 10 minutes. It will seem quite dry.  Stir in garlic, thyme, and file, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add tomatoes and cook about 1 minute. Slowly whisk in 3 3/4 cups of the stock along with the vegan fish sauce until smooth.  Increase heat to medium-high and bring to a simmer.
  4. FINISH GUMBO Stir okra into gumbo and simmer for about 20 minutes while rice cooks; reduce heat to medium if cooking too fast.  Meanwhile, place textured vegetable protein (TVP) in a medium bowl and pour remaining 2 cups of hot stock over.  Let sit for 5 to10 minutes or until TVP has softened.  Stir into gumbo and adjust seasoning if desired. Serve with a scoop of white rice and, possibly, biscuits or garlic bread.

DSCN0783

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Yield: 4 servings

I will admit that this non-traditional chili came from very humble beginnings–a zucchini from the farmer’s market that needed used and soon and some textured vegetable protein, which keeps forever and that I had had on hand for about that long–but it is glorious!

It is also simple to prepare, mouth-watering, a beautiful golden color, nutritious, filling-but-not-too, and delightfully perfumed.

“TVP?” you may wonder.  Believe me, I did too.   I suppose I ate it at some point–probably in school lunches back when its cost effectiveness as a cheap source of protein led to it being camouflaged in a variety of dishes–but I know I have never cooked it.  I purchased it quite a while ago out of curiosity.  Turns out that I really liked both its texture and flavor, namely whatever it is cooked with.  Something about its appearance and texture reminded me of chopped clams (from back in the day), so stay-tuned for some kind of yummy chowder.

In the meantime, enjoy this chili!

2 cups textured vegetable protein (TVP) or crumbled vegan ground meat substitute, e.g. soy crumbles or tempeh

2 cups vegetable stock

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 medium onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice

Sea salt

4 large cloves garlic, very thinly sliced

2-8 inch zucchini, ends trimmed, sliced vertically, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 stick cinnamon, broken in half

2 teaspoons ground coriander

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon chipotle chili powder (or 1 teaspoon of a milder chili powder like Ancho)

1 cup coconut milk

1 cup pureed pumpkin

Optional garnishes: vegan sour cream, broken cinnamon sticks, and/or roasted and lightly salted pumpkin seeds

In a 2-quart saucepan, combine textured vegetable protein (TVP) and stock.  Bring to a vigorous simmer over medium-high heat and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently, until the stock is absorbed, about 10 minutes.

In a large skillet (cast iron is always my preference), heat olive oil to shimmering over medium-high heat.  Add onion and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until softened.  Add garlic and cook another 30 seconds to 1 minute, stirring, until softened.  Add zucchini, and saute, stirring frequently, until softened, about 3-5 minutes.  Add textured vegetable protein, wine, cinnamon sticks, coriander, cumin, smoked paprika, and chipotle chili powder, and stir well.   Stir in coconut milk and pumpkin and cook, stirring fairly frequently, for about 10 minutes or until flavors marry.  Thin with a little water or white wine if necessary.  Check for salt and stir in more if necessary.  Serve warm in bowls garnished, if desired, with vegan sour cream, a piece of a cinnamon stick, and a few roasted and lightly salted pumpkin seeds.

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Yield: 4 servings

This simple, flavorful and robust “Chicken,” Green Chili and Hominy Posole is sure to become a cold weather favorite.  However, unlike most of my recipes, it doesn’t rely on seasonal ingredients, so you can actually enjoy it any time the mood strikes.

I have never made, much less eaten, Posole, but a non-vegan recipe in a recent culinary magazine made my mouth water.  So, recently, with Posole on my mind, I created my own version without even referring to that recipe.  I did, however, check online to make sure I knew what spices to include.

My version departs a bit because, well, that’s what I do, though I still stayed true to the dish.  So, I used the traditional dried oregano, but I substituted ground coriander for fresh cilantro because I didn’t have any, and I used smoked paprika instead of cayenne because those smoky undertones are irresistible to me and seemed perfect for the dish.  Also, I find the more subtle and complex heat of paprika a bit more appealing than that of cayenne.  Plus, the color was also lovely. For some reason, a note of cinnamon sounded good to me, so I added a couple of cinnamon sticks for a background note of warmth.  It was perfect!

The other main difference is that instead of serving warm corn tortillas alongside the soup, I decided to dice up a few and saute them with the onion for additional corn flavor, as well as for texture.  But don’t worry; this is not yet another version of tortilla soup!  It is Posole through and through.

I loved it and wouldn’t change a thing.  And I hope you agree.  But should you not, have some fun making it your own!  Find the recipe HERE where the good folks at One Green Planet were happy to publish it.

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Before the mercury climbs and this winter’s kale is all gone, be kind to yourself with my healthy brand of tasty comfort food as published on Go Dairy Free.

Just click HERE for the recipe, nutritional information, and a little of the back story involving a Superbowl party, a dog named Huff, and a million dollar-winning commercial!

Thanks, as always to Alisa Fleming, creator and founder of Go Dairy Free!

For 150+ additional seasonal recipes, see The Blooming Platter Cookbook: A Harvest of Seasonal Vegan Recipes.

 

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My Mam-ma was an excellent country cook, but this soul-satisfying vegan soup rivals her chicken-n-dumplings.  Plus, while it hasn’t forgotten where it came from, it’s gone a bit uptown.

Not Your Mama’s Vegan Chicken Noodle Soup is a healthy and simple version of the chicken noodle soup you may remember from childhood.  But, not only is it vegan, it’s a bit more grown-up and “gourmet” courtesy of the orecchiette and, especially, the pesto.    The latter celebrates some of winter’s finest ingredients: oranges and kale.  A dollop of it is optional, but I highly recommend it for a delicious burst of contrasting flavor, texture and temperature atop a mug of the warm soup.

With chilly rain in our forecast starting this evening and continuing through tomorrow, and the fridge is nearly barren of leftovers, I think this soup may be in order to warm up the weekend….but, trust me, t’s just as good when the sun is shining!

Not Your Mama’s Vegan Chicken Noodle Soup

Yield: 6 servings

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 cup yellow onion cut into 1/4-inch dice

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup celery cut into 1/4-inch dice

1/2 cup carrot, cut into 1/4-inch dice

1 teaspoon rubbed sage

1 teaspoon dried tarragon

1 teaspoon powdered thyme

2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour

1/4 cup nutritional yeast

8 cups faux chicken or vegetable stock (I purchase extra large faux chicken bouillon cubes and use 4 with 8 cups of water, as I think the seasoning lends more of a “pot pie” flavor than vegetable stock does)

2 bay leaves

4 ounces dried Orecchiette (ear-shaped pasta rarely made with egg, but check to be sure)

8 ounces chicken-flavored seitan (I use MorningStar Farms® Meal Starters® Chik’n Strips which have plenty of salt and pepper for my palate)

1/2 cup unsweetened soymilk

Sea salt to taste, if needed

Freshly ground black pepper to taste, if needed

Optional accompaniment (but very good!) : a little “glug” of sherry in each bowl or mug

In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high, heat olive oil until shimmering.  Add onion and saute, stirring frequently, until translucent and softened, about 3 minutes.  Add garlic and saute, stirring, for 30 seconds.  Avoid over-browning.  Add celery and carrot and saute, stirring frequently until both are slightly softened, or about another 3 minutes.  Add sage, tarragon, thyme, flour and nutritional yeast, and stir to distribute evenly.  Stir in stock and bay leaves and heat to a simmer.  Add pasta and simmer until al dente, about 7-8  minutes.  Stir in chicken-flavored seitan and heat through, followed by the soy milk.  Check for seasoning and add salt and pepper to taste.  Serve hot  in bowls or mugs topped with my optional, but recommended, Vegan Orange-Scented Kale and Pumpkin Seed Pesto.  I also LOVE this soup with a little “glug” of sherry added to each serving.

 

Vegan Orange-Scented Kale and Pumpkin Seed Pesto

4 cups stemmed, roughly chopped or torn, and lightly packed fresh kale

1 cup roasted and lightly salted pepitas (pumpkin seeds) (I purchase Trader Joe’s Brand)

1/4 cup olive oil or to taste

Zest of one medium naval orange

2 teaspoons fresh orange juice

Sea salt to taste, if needed

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Place kale and pepitas in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until finely chopped.  With the motor running, drizzle in the oil, and turn off the machine as soon as the last drop of oil has fallen in.  Remove the lid and add zest, juice and salt and pepper to taste.  Pulse a couple more times and then chill, tightly covered, before serving.

For 150+ additional inspired seasonal recipes, I invite you to peruse The Blooming Platter Cookbook: A Harvest of Seasonal Vegan Recipes.

 

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Thanks to FARM for not only publishing my vegan White Bean and Kale Stew recipe from The Blooming Platter Cookbook, but for also including nutritional information, Gimme Lean product information, and an article on the fast food-obesity connection.  Just click HERE to access the newsletter, including recipe.

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Yield: 4-6 servings

If you live in a part of the world where temperatures have dipped–or never rose to begin with–this ultra-simple, ultra-satisfying chili will warm you from the inside out.  However, if you live in warmer climes, a bowl of this spicy soup  just might get a little perspiration going and cool you down–nature’s own air conditioning.

The most difficult part of making this dish is waiting while the chili simmers for 25 minutes  to allow the flavors to marry.

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 medium yellow onion, but into 1/4-inch dice

2 large cloves garlic, chopped

8 ounces tempeh

sea salt and pepper to taste

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground oregano

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon smoked, sweet or spicy paprika

1/4 teaspoon chipotle chili powder

1-15 ounce can petite diced tomatoes in juice

12 ounces light beer or non-alcoholic beer (see note below)

1 tablespoon miso paste (any kind)

1 tablespoon brown rice syrup or agave nectar

(Note: you may substitute 2 tablespoons of tomato paste for the miso paste and the brown rice syrup.)

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

1 cup frozen corn

1-15.5 ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained

Optional: 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast

Optional garnishes: dollops of my Vegan Cheddar “Cheese,” dollops of vegan sour cream, and cilantro sprigs

Optional accompaniment: Frito Scoops for “Frito Chili Pie”

Heat oil to shimmering in a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.  Add onion, garlic, and a pinch of salt, and saute, stirring frequently, for 3 minutes.  Crumble tempeh into the pa, add all spices and saute, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes or just until tempeh starts to brown.  Add all remaining ingredients and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes or until all flavors have married.  Serve hot garnished as desired.

Note:  According to Ali Tadayon in “Beware the Beer: Is Yours Vegan,” found in the Vegan Mainstream e-newsletter, not all beer is vegan, as it may include albium (derived from animal blood), isinglass (derived from the swim bladders of fish), gelatin, charcoal, pepsin, lactose, and even insects.  She recommends the following vegan-approved beers: Amstel, Corona, Heineken, New Belgium Brewery, Pabst Brewing, Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, and Tecate over these non-vegan ones:  Castle Rock Brewery, Guinness, Newcastle Brown Ale, and Red Stripe.

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